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2000 San Leonardo

2000 San Leonardo

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From the critics:

93 DEC

92 RP

91 VM

Critic Reviews

Lush oaky blackcurrant nose, forthright and assertive but not too charred. This has a sweet attack, its richness and concentration cut by sinewy tannins. This is in a muscular style but isn’t tough thanks to its underlying sucrosity, and fine acidity gives it persistence and drive.

Decanter | 93 DEC
The 2000 San Leonardo comes from a relatively uneventful vintage and displays classic characteristics of the wine, without extreme high or low points. In fact, this vintage will be remembered for its even-keeled nature and abundant fruit generosity. The wine still tastes young, despite its 15 years in the bottle. It opens to plush cherry, blackberry, Indian spice and tobacco. There’s a point of strong firmness to the tannins that suggest it needs a few more years in the bottle. Harvest was finished on time by mid-October. By the 2000 vintage, Tenuta San Leonardo had reached its current average production of 95,000 bottles per year.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 92 RP
Dusty rose, a mix of dried cherries, black currant, plums and smoky minerality make the 2000 San Leonardo a total pleasure. Round textures give way to ripe red and black berry fruit, contrasted by a mix of stimulating acids and minerals. Fine tannins slowly mount toward the finale, which is long and spicy, leaning more toward the sour red fruit end of the spectrum. Peppery herbs linger, along with just a hint of heat that creates a warming effect, yet there’s no lack of balance. This warm and dry vintage created a larger-scale San Leonardo, which may not enjoy as long of a life as some of the surrounding years. Still, it is drinking beautifully right now and at no risk of decline in the immediate future.

Vinous Media | 91 VM

Wine Details for 2000 San Leonardo

Type of Wine Super Tuscan/IGT : Many grape varietals are planted all over the world so they're not typical for one single country anymore. For instance, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc form part of many blends coming from different countries. Super Tuscan wines are produced in this Italian region, but grape varietals used in the making are not indigenous - those are mostly Syrah, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon.
Varietal Proprietary Blend : Proprietary Blend is a general term used to indicate that a wine is comprised of multiple grape varietals which are either “proprietary” to the winery or is blended and does not meet the required maximum or minimum percentage of a particular varietal. This also is the case for the grape’s place of origin, especially for region, appellation or vineyard designated wines. There are endless examples of blended wines which are labeled as “Proprietary Blend” and in conjunction with each region’s stipulated wine laws and regulations makes for a vast blanket for wines to fall into. Perhaps the simplest example is California; if a wine is to be labeled as Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, it is required to have at least 75% of the varietal (Cabernet Sauvignon) and 85% of the fruit must be cultivated from the Napa Valley wine district. If the wine does not meet the requirements, it is then labeled as Proprietary Blend.

Country Italy : Italy is renowned as one of the world’s greatest gastronomic havens; from certified Prosciutto di Parma to the sea-side seafood eateries on the island of Sicily. However, this epicurean experience could not possibly be as hedonistic without the ethereal combination of the country’s plethora of fine wines. It seems unfair that a nation should be able to boast, both, some of the world’s greatest cuisine as well as its greatest wines. Italian wine is one of the most sought after in the world, and has become the second most produced in the world, behind only France.



Stretching an impressive 736 miles from northern Italy to the peninsula’s southern tip, the country’s geography generates an enormous array of topography, climate and soil structure. This is an extremely important quality of its winegrowing and making industry which lays claim to nearly 550 different grape varietals, which all desire their own necessities, in terms of terroir and climate.



The still red wines of Italy truly characterize the nation’s vast and expansive terroir; Nebbiolo dominates Piedmont, where Barolo and Barbaresco reign king and queen of the region’s production. Hailing from Brunello di Montalcino in Tuscany, the rockstar Sangiovese grape has become synonymous with greatness. Vin Santo sweet wines have taken on a mighty feat of competing with the glorious wines of Sauternes, and of course, Prosecco. Prosecco, located in Trieste (northeast Italy) and its creation of luxuriously effervescent styles of wine has become Italy’s answer to Champagne. The Glera grape variety, which has become synonymous with the name Prosecco, is the main ingredient and is beloved in the appellation where the village of Prosecco’s name has become world renowned.



The blurred boundary between Italy and the countries of Slovenia and Austria, where German influence still resonates through Friuli wines. The prevalence of Riesling and other such grape varietals is high in this region and have become extremely popular on today’s market.



With nearly 702,000 hectares of grapevines covering the massive and diverse landscape, Italy’s annual average of 48.3 million hectoliters of wine production is second only to France in terms of volume and Spain in terms of hectares of vines. The country is vast and overwhelming when it comes to the culinary arts, but perhaps even this is overshadowed by its production of some of the world’s most sought after wines, whether the omnipresent Chianti to the highly collectible and sought after Amarone della Valpolicalla.


Region Trentino : The tall, steep Dolomites in the far north of Italy with their towering peaks and nearly vertical sides provide a unique cozy shelter to the long valleys situated in their foothills. There, blessed by constant warm breeze and protected from any harm lies Trentino, home to a thousands of years-long winemaking tradition. The forty-degrees warm summers in this province may surprise first-time visitors, given the dramatic terrain of the location, but you could tell that Trentino lies within a sweet spot by their legendary wines alone, without ever having been there in person to see this place in its full glory. This is further confirmed by their expertise and skill in producing a variety of excellent wines, able to enchant a diverse audience of connoisseurs. Trentino's vast pedigree has been traditionally most notable for its honey-perfumed, sparkling, Chardonnay-based wines and the classic style of their production.

Besides the overachieving whites, Trentino offers a wonderful selection of red wines, made from indigenous Teroldego and Marzemino grapes, as well as some of the most renowned Bordeaux blends in Italy. Rich granite, earthy hues and unbelievably melty tannins are typical for this region. The options are many to choose from, though there's no need to limit oneself to sampling just one type of wine from this region.

Subregion Vigneti delle Dolomiti

Overview

Producer San Leonardo

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