2004 Philipponnat Clos des Goisses

97
AG
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2004-philipponnat-clos-des-goisses
 

Wine Critic Reviews for 2004 Philipponnat Clos des Goisses

The 2004 Clos des Goisses is dense and powerful in the glass, with all of the pure, unbridled energy that has always been such a signature here. Hints of lemon peel, mint, spice and crushed rocks emerge with time in the glass, but, despite its considerable beauty and unquestioned pedigree, the 2004 is frankly years away from delivering the full Clos des Goisses experience. Disgorged February 2013.

Antonio Galloni | 97 AG
From their iconic steep, south-facing, riverside vineyard in Mareuil-sur-Ay - acquired in 1935 - Philipponnat's strikingly beautiful 2004 Brut Clos des Goisses betrays no suggestion of alcoholic weight or opacity such as one might associate with an especially warm, fast-ripening vineyard. On the contrary, this is a bottling that combines silken feel with delicacy, refreshment, and utmost transparency to nuance. Chamomile, mint and lily-of-the-valley don't just turn heads from the rim of the glass; they waft through this wine's entire palate performance, against a greenhouse-like background of diverse if elusive flowering and leafing things. Salivary gland-tugging salinity and hints of chalk suffuse a fruit matrix of white peach, lime, red raspberry and red currant whose juicy, subtly crunchy expressions put me a bit in mind of certain supreme Nahe Rieslings. This site's reflection in the Marne River is itself iconic, but its reflection in your glass will prove kaleidoscopically spellbinding. That effect persisted during the four days I had the pleasure of following this 2004, and I suspect that subsequent bottles will prove worth following for at least a decade.

The house of Philipponnat - which owns 44 prime acres in and around Mareuil-sur-Ay, its base of operations ever since having completed a new press house and cellar there in 2004 - is headed by Charles Philipponat, although it's owned by the group that controls Champagne Bruno Paillard Philipponnat. This house's Clos des Goisses estate vineyard is justly renowned, but on the occasion of my recent tasting, their extra brut "1522" - named for the year in which the first Philipponnat began farming vines, in Ay - proved almost as compelling.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 96 RP
(Philipponnat Clos des Goisses Brut (Disgorged November 2013)) The 2004 Clos des Goisses is one of the very few vintages here that has undergone malolactic fermentation, as the wine undertook this decision on its own, and the malo took place in bottle while the wine was resting on its lees and awaiting its dosage for the secondary fermentation. Given the raciness of the 2004 vintage in general, the full malo here is hardly to be noticed, and without Charles Philipponnat having told me about this, I doubt that I would have ever noticed. The wine has opened up a bit since I last tasted it at the domaine at the end of March, and this is destined to be a great vintage of Clos des Goisses in the fullness of time. The superb bouquet shows off outstanding depth and nascent complexity in its constellation of apple, tart orange, a touch of cranberry, complex, youthful minerality, plenty of smokiness and early signs of the wine’s classic nuttiness already emerging in the upper register. On the palate the wine is pure, full-bodied and rock solid at the core, with outstanding focus and grip, very refined mousse and simply superb length on the poised and perfectly balanced finish. I did not know 2004’s telltale touch of herbacité here in New York that I noted in Mareuil in March, and I now think that this element was more a function of its relatively recent disgorgement (only four months previous when I first tasted it), rather than a signature in this vintage of Clos des Goisses. This will be a great wine. (Drink between 2020-2070).

John Gilman | 95+ JG
This is back to Clos des Goisses' traditional composition of two-thirds Pinot Noir and one-third Chardonnay. Beautifully ripe and aromatic, the Pinot adds dimension and breadth, but loses nothing in precision, to the taut mineral Chardonnay. An extremely graceful wine in perfect balance for current drinking - enjoy with scallops, roast turbot with cepes, or a mature Jura cheese. Dosage 4.25 g/l (extra Brut). Drinking Window 2018 - 2030.

Decanter | 95 DEC

Wine Details on 2004 Philipponnat Clos des Goisses

More Information
Producer Philipponn
Region Champagne: The sharp, biting acidity, cutting through the richness; the explosive force that shatters the bubbles as they rise to the surface; the intense flavor and compelling, lively mouthfeel; these are all hallmarks of a good Champagne. Most wines are made from a combination of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier, but there are pure-Chardonnay variants and ones that blend only Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. As a result, most wines come with a feeling of familiarity, if not nostalgia. Each Champagne house has its own unique style, so different bottles of Champagne may not resemble each other outside of the core varietal strengths. The soil composition of the subregion is characterized by belemnite and chalk, which lets it absorb heat during the daytime and release it at night. This terroir helps create the feeling of airy, playful lightness of fine sparkling wine.

These wines were originally marketed towards royalty, and you can feel a hint of that elusive blue-blood elegance and confidence while drinking one. A good Champagne carries you away like a hurricane carries small debris, and you can feel the powerful life force in each bubble even. The characteristic Champagne "pop" has become a staple at parties and celebrations around the globe - when you hear it, good times are right around the corner.
Subregion Pomerol
Appellation Amarone della Valpolicella
Climat/Vineyard Brunate
Cru Grand Cru
Country France: Words fail us when trying to adequately portray France's place in the world of wine. It's downright impossible to imagine what wine would feel and taste like had it not been for France's many, many viticultural pioneers. Fine wine is the blood of France's vigorously beating heart, and it finds itself in many aspects of French culture. With a viticultural history that dates all the way back to the 6th century BC, France now enjoys its position as the most famous and reputable wine region on the planet. If you have a burning passion for masterfully crafted, mouth-watering, mind-expanding wines, then regular visits to France are probably already in your schedule, and for a good reason.
Type of Wine Champagne: Nothing like a refreshing, vivacious glass of fine Champagne during a hot summer afternoon. Typically combining Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier, each Champagne house has a distinct style. Whether you want to sample a single varietal (such as the 100% Chardonnay blanc de blancs) or a tasteful blend, no region can compete with Champagne.
Varietal Champagne Blend: The Champagne blend is one of the most distinctive styles of winemaking in the world. This illustrious blend of grape varietals hails from northeastern France, in the winegrowing region of Champagne. The magical combination of varietals perfectly marry to the terroir, climate and topography of the region, creating a sexy, seductive and fascinating sparkling wine that is synonymous with success and celebration.

The primary grape varietals cultivated in Champagne and most used for blending are Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. In fact, there are seven permitted grape varieties in the Champagne AOC (controlled designation of origin) though the other four are so rarely used they are often forgotten (Pinot Gris, Pinot Blanc Petit Meslier and Arbane). The three grape varietals of Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier account for about 99% of the region’s plantings. Chardonnay is planted to 10,117 hectares, Pinot Meunier is planted to 10,521 hectares while the most widely planted, Pinot Noir, covers around 12,950 hectares.

Chardonnay brings crisp and refreshing nuances to the effervescent wine blend. When used as a single-variety offering, the wines are named Blanc de Blancs, and account for only around 3% of all Champagne bottlings. Pinot Noir is the staple in Champagne blends and interestingly, is planted in more hectares in Champagne than its ancestral home of Burgundy. It is one of just two allowable red grapes in the region. Pinot Noir brings body and mouth-filling structural texture to the blend. When used as a single-variety its creation is called Blanc de Noirs (white wine made from black-skinned grapes). Pinot Meunier, the other red grape permitted in Champagne brings red berry flavors and balances the overall blend. Though historically a blending grape, 100% Pinot Meunier Champagne wines are becoming increasingly popular.

Champagne has privileged environmental influences that give the wines produced here specific, unique characteristics that are often imitated but never duplicated. Its northern location, rugged climate, distinctive soil type and hillside vineyards makes Champagne terroir the only one of its kind. The first distinguishing factor is that Champagne enjoys a dual climate influenced by oceanic currents and continental winds. The oceanic currents help to keep the temperatures cooler, while the continental influence brings precipitation which are both essential for quality grape production.

Terroir is the second major component to the success of the grapes of Champagne to grow and prosper. It is composed mostly limestone (75%) chalk and marl with a limestone subsoil. The fissured medium provides good drainage, promoting the health and development of the vines. Each soil type is important to the stages of development. The chalk in Champagne consists of granules of calcite formed from fragile marine shells and micro-organisms. This highly porous compound assists in water movement into the root system. The limestone, being less porous allows the right amount of water to be collected while restricting erosion. Marl is just as important and contains highly rich minerals which allows the growth of berries with intense flavors.

The third distinguishing factor is the gift of Champagne’s natural landscape where the rugged and hilly terrain greatly assists in water drainage and root growth. The average gradient is around 12% with some of the slopes reaching grades as steep as 59%. The higher elevations receive greater sunlight than lower elevations at the same latitude. This feature alone creates diverse micro-climates within the region allowing grapes grown in different locations and at different Champagne houses to have unique characteristics.

The varietals of Champagne, the terroir of the region along with the oceanic and continental climatic influences come together to create one of earth’s most breathtaking wine styles. From the many styles and offerings, Brut (dry, raw or unrefined) to rose, vintage to non-vintage, Champagne blends offer to the world a euphoric, effervescent experience that cannot be matched.

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