2006 Sassicaia

99
DEC
Only %1 left
Product ID
2006-sassicaia

Wine Critic Reviews for 2006 Sassicaia

To be honest I gave the Sassicaia 1985 a 100 points at the same tasting, but those notes have already been published, and it’s a vintage that has been celebrated plenty of times. Both bottles were from one of the standout tastings of the year – in Rome, a vertical of Sassicaia dating back over five decades. This 2006 has guts and glory, there is stuffing here. The exotic heat comes through like a pan-seared filet steak, nothing more than a flash fire that gives way to succulence. More exoticism with the dancing array of flavours, from plums, damson and spices to forest fruits and heather then the menthol kicks comes in. You just want to linger over this glass, pick apart the individual flavours and get to understand what it is saying.

Decanter | 99 DEC
The Tenuta San Guido 2006 Bolgheri Sassicaia is a timeless classic. This might just be the vintage to photograph in an encyclopedia entry for Sassicaia. This is especially true at this exact moment in its long and promising drinking window. The wine shows less volume compared to some of the more opulent vintages, but it absolutely excels in terms of length and finish. It offers amazing drive and momentum that are fueled by the extremely fine nature of the wine's texture and the seamless unity of its flavors. It treads in light and delicate footsteps that will carry it far into the future. As they say in Italian: "Piano piano si va lontano" (slowly slowly you go far).

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 96 RP
Sweet tobacco and berry with hints of currants. Full, soft and silky. Lots of fruit and a long finish. It's subtle, dense and sophisticated. Please give this another five years to really show what it has.

James Suckling | 95 JS
(85% cabernet sauvignon and 15% cabernet franc) Bright red-ruby. Complex nose melds red cherry, blackcurrant, minerals, dried herbs and a delicate oaky vanillin nuance; the fruit aromas show an almost roasted quality without going over the top. Sweet, concentrated and nicely fresh, with an impression of strong extract and a hint of exotic fruits to the flavors of ripe red and dark berries, chocolate, plum and wild herbs. The candied fruit quality carries through on the long, smooth finish, where there's a trace of heat and hints of menthol and minerals. A very successful Sassicaia but, in my notebook, just a little below the lofty heights of the 2001 or 2004. But given the quality of this wine, that's quibbling.

Vinous Media | 95 VM
This landmark wine (85% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Cabernet Franc) shows herbal notes of chopped mint, wild berry, licorice, bramble and forest floor. Tasted young, Sassicaia never has the same impact it will 10 or 15 years from now when all those luscious aromas become more penetrating and warm. Built to age, the wine boasts drying tannins, good acidity and firm structure.

Wine Enthusiast | 94 WE
Displays sweet tobacco, plum and berry aromas, with a jammy undertone, turning to licorice on the palate. Full-bodied and balanced, with silky tannins, a lovely texture and plenty of fruit. Outstanding Sassicaia, with structure and finesse. 85 percent Cabernet Sauvignon and 15 percent Cabernet Franc. Best after 2013. 20,000 cases made, 3,000 cases imported.

Wine Spectator | 94 WS
No written review provided | 92 W&S

More Information
Vintage 2006
Color Red
Country Italy: What are the first things that come to mind when thinking about Italy and Italian culture? There's one thing that nearly everyone tends to mention, it's the food - and where there's fine food, there is almost always fine wine. Italy is the most prolific wine region in the world, outclassing even France in terms of production quantity. Even if you're a complete wine novice, you have almost certainly heard of names such as Barolo and Barbaresco, Italy's most famous wine styles. When it comes to soil composition and other geographical characteristics, Italy offers a lot of diversity, and this never fails to show in the wines themselves.
Producer Sassicaia: The story of Sassicaia in the 1920s begins with Mario Incisa della Rocchetta, and his dream of creating a ‘thoroughbred' wine, that at the time, was no other than Bordeaux. As all Premier Cru vineyards, grapes are hand-picked and subjected to soft pressing and fermentation in steel at a controlled temperature of 30-31 °C. After steel malolactic fermentation, the wine is placed in French oak barrels, where it ages for at least a minimum of 2 years before being bottled. The wine is characterized by an intense and regal red color. When it comes to taste, a wide variety of red fruits provide a full-bodied taste, while soft tannins ensure a long-lasting finish. The overall balanced perfection in the tasting makes Sassicaia suitable for all special occasions.
Rating 99 DEC
Region Tuscany: Italian culture worships the concept of a shared meal, and their wines scream for a chance to be uncorked with your friends and family. The region's Mediterranean climate and hilly landscape combine to create a beautiful viticultural environment, where every chosen grape is brought to its full potential and transmuted into drinks worthy of gods. The vineyards are planted along the higher reaches of the hill slopes, creating a gorgeous view of the Italian landscape. Once your lips kiss the wine, you're sent spiraling down a veritable whirlpool of pure flavor, touching upon notes of sensuous cherry, nuts, floral hints and undertones of honey and minerals. The wines can be as sweet as a fresh summer romance, and carry an air of dignity and elegance about them that can stimulate your intellect for months as you contemplate the seemingly infinite intricacies and details in the texture. Tuscany is an important part of Italian viticulture, and sampling their wines is the closest you can get to visiting this heavenly region and experiencing the culture.
Type of Wine Super Tuscans/IGT
OWC No
Varietal Proprietary Blend: There's a level of mystery and intrigue when it comes to drinking a wine for which you're not fully informed about, and if that sounds like a thrilling idea to you, then you're probably already interested in proprietary blends. While the concept doesn't have a legal definition, it is used to describe blends whose components aren't disclosed by the producer. In many cases, the wine tends to be a Bordeaux-inspired blend, but this isn't always the case.
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