2012 Sassicaia

99
WE
Only %1 left
Product ID
2012-sassicaia

Wine Critic Reviews for 2012 Sassicaia

One of Italy's most iconic bottlings, the 2012 Sassicaia is drop-dead gorgeous. A blend of 85% Cabernet Sauvignon and 15% Cabernet Franc, it boasts sensations of blue flowers, cedar, juicy red currants, ripe raspberries, white pepper and a balsamic note. Structured, radiant and loaded with finesse, it delivers everything you'd expect from a world-class wine and more. Drink 2018–2032.

Wine Enthusiast | 99 WE
Lots of lavender, minerals and black currants on the nose. Turns to blackberries. Full body, ultra-refined tannins and an exquisite finish. This is all about delicacy, finesse and grace. Yet there is a solid core of ripe tannins giving it backbone and outstanding form. Just opening now. Very pretty.

James Suckling | 95 JS
The 2012 Sassicaia is dark and immediate, with gorgeous up-front richness, density and power. Black cherry jam, cloves and new leather are some of the many signatures that take shape in the glass. The 2012 is an unusually deep, concentrated Sassicaia that is going to need time in bottle to develop the full breadth of its aromas and flavors. Today, it is a bit monolithic, so readers need to be patient.

Vinous Media | 94 VM
The summer of 2012 in Bolgheri was long and hot, but the cooler evening temperature allowed Sassicaia to pull in a wine that shows plenty of ripeness while retaining vibrancy and freshness. A blend of cabernet sauvignon with 15 percent cabernet franc, it shows a quiet confidence in the way it melds flavors of black currant and red raspberry with fresh thyme, toasted nuts and the black spice it picked up from two years in French oak barrels. The texture is velvety, balanced by a streak of graphite and finely etched tannins robust enough to take on a seared steak.

Wine & Spirits | 94 W&S
Tenuta San Guido's newest release is the 2012 Bolgheri Sassicaia. This was a warm vintage, especially during summer months that saw hot winds and little rain. Thankfully, winter months delivered ample precipitation. Vines had good access to moisture underground. Production of the lower-tier wines was reduced: Le Difese was cut by 40% and Guidalberto by 30%. But Sassicaia’s production numbers remained stable at 200,000 bottles because all the estate’s best fruit was directed toward this product. Fruit was harvested a bit early to avoid problems with over ripeness. The wine presents a soft, velvety mouthfeel with plump cherry, fruity berry, blue flower and spice. Perhaps it shows more simplicity overall, but it does so with an impressive sense of harmony and confidence. This is not one of the great vintages of Sassicaia, but the wine flaunts its considerable pedigree nonetheless. It should age gracefully for twenty years or more.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 93 RP
A rich and intense style, this exhibits flavors of vanilla, toast and black cherry wrapped in stern tannins. A bit gruff overall, showing just a hint of the elegance and finesse on the lengthy finish. Needs some time. Best from 2019 through 2032. 17,000 cases made, 4,000 cases imported.

Wine Spectator | 93 WS
Structure and shoulders are a little more obvious here, the colour deepens and widens, and the power is evident right from the first nose. A powerful tannic structure holds the fruit, you can feel the grip and it is clear that even at this age it’s barely out of the starting block. It takes a few minutes to soften and open, then the liquorice, chocolate and balsamic notes come through, balancing out and deepening the tight spiced fruits.

Decanter | 92 DEC

More Information
Vintage 2012
Color Red
Country Italy: What are the first things that come to mind when thinking about Italy and Italian culture? There's one thing that nearly everyone tends to mention, it's the food - and where there's fine food, there is almost always fine wine. Italy is the most prolific wine region in the world, outclassing even France in terms of production quantity. Even if you're a complete wine novice, you have almost certainly heard of names such as Barolo and Barbaresco, Italy's most famous wine styles. When it comes to soil composition and other geographical characteristics, Italy offers a lot of diversity, and this never fails to show in the wines themselves.
Producer Sassicaia
Rating 99 WE
Region Tuscany: Italian culture worships the concept of a shared meal, and their wines scream for a chance to be uncorked with your friends and family. The region's Mediterranean climate and hilly landscape combine to create a beautiful viticultural environment, where every chosen grape is brought to its full potential and transmuted into drinks worthy of gods. The vineyards are planted along the higher reaches of the hill slopes, creating a gorgeous view of the Italian landscape. Once your lips kiss the wine, you're sent spiraling down a veritable whirlpool of pure flavor, touching upon notes of sensuous cherry, nuts, floral hints and undertones of honey and minerals. The wines can be as sweet as a fresh summer romance, and carry an air of dignity and elegance about them that can stimulate your intellect for months as you contemplate the seemingly infinite intricacies and details in the texture. Tuscany is an important part of Italian viticulture, and sampling their wines is the closest you can get to visiting this heavenly region and experiencing the culture.
Type of Wine Super Tuscan/IGT: Many grape varietals are planted all over the world so they're not typical for one single country anymore. For instance, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc form part of many blends coming from different countries. Super Tuscan wines are produced in this Italian region, but grape varietals used in the making are not indigenous - those are mostly Syrah, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon.
OWC No
Varietal Proprietary Blend: There's a level of mystery and intrigue when it comes to drinking a wine for which you're not fully informed about, and if that sounds like a thrilling idea to you, then you're probably already interested in proprietary blends. While the concept doesn't have a legal definition, it is used to describe blends whose components aren't disclosed by the producer. In many cases, the wine tends to be a Bordeaux-inspired blend, but this isn't always the case.
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