2015 Poggio Antico Brunello di Montalcino

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2015-poggio-antico-brunello-di-montalcino

Wine Critic Reviews for 2015 Poggio Antico Brunello di Montalcino

This understated Brunello delivers dried cherries, cumin, terracotta, rust and bark. The full-bodied palate presents an intricately detailed tapestry of finely interwoven tannins, interspersed with compressed, vibrant cherries and gilded in colorful, gleaming acidity. The finish is vivacious and polished and very long. Drink from 2024.

James Suckling | 97 JS
Poggio Antico brings us a classic expression of Sangiovese in its 2015 Brunello di Montalcino. The warm vintage has shaped more density and volume in the fruit, but fundamentally this wine holds tight to the bright and fresh taste profile that is characteristic of Brunello. The key is the acidity that remains an integral and important element in the fundamental architecture of this wine. That natural crispness serves to underline lively fruit flavors of wild cherry and pressed violets. Background tones of earth and black licorice also appear. The team at Poggio Antico, located at one of the highest altitudes in the appellation (from 500 to 550 meters above sea level), has worked well to preserve the cool climate characteristics in this very warm and sunny vintage. Some 36,000 bottles were made. This wine went into bottle in August 2018 and hit the market in January 2020.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 95 RP
Bright red with a pale rim. Captivating aromas of ripe red fruits, blueberry nectar, marzipan and Oriental spices. Boasts outstanding inner-mouth perfume and precise flavors of ripe red cherry, redcurrant jelly, potpourri and minerals. Finishes long and seamless. This is one of the best non-single vineyard Brunellos of the vintage and one of the better wines from Poggio Antico in some time.

Vinous Media | 94+ VM
Cherry, plum, earth, wild scrub and salty flavors are the hallmarks of this dense, hefty red. An iron note becomes more prominent as this evolves on the palate. Well-balanced, with the ripe fruit and saline elements lingering on the finish. Best from 2023 through 2043. 3,000 cases made, 1,200 cases imported. — BS

Wine Spectator | 94 WS
Forest floor, mature red berry, dried tobacco leaf and balsamic whiffs of camphor come together on this. It's firm and concentrated, delivering dried black cherry, licorice and coffee bean framed in velvety tannins. Drink 2022–2027.

Wine Enthusiast | 92 WE

Wine Details on 2015 Poggio Antico Brunello di Montalcino

More Information
Producer Poggio Antico
Region Tuscany: Italian culture worships the concept of a shared meal, and their wines scream for a chance to be uncorked with your friends and family. The region's Mediterranean climate and hilly landscape combine to create a beautiful viticultural environment, where every chosen grape is brought to its full potential and transmuted into drinks worthy of gods. The vineyards are planted along the higher reaches of the hill slopes, creating a gorgeous view of the Italian landscape.

Once your lips kiss the wine, you're sent spiraling down a veritable whirlpool of pure flavor, touching upon notes of sensuous cherry, nuts, floral hints and undertones of honey and minerals. The wines can be as sweet as a fresh summer romance, and carry an air of dignity and elegance about them that can stimulate your intellect for months as you contemplate the seemingly infinite intricacies and details in the texture. Tuscany is an important part of Italian viticulture, and sampling their wines is the closest you can get to visiting this heavenly region and experiencing the culture.
Country Italy: What are the first things that come to mind when thinking about Italy and Italian culture? There's one thing that nearly everyone tends to mention, it's the food - and where there's fine food, there is almost always fine wine. Italy is the most prolific wine region in the world, outclassing even France in terms of production quantity. Even if you're a complete wine novice, you have almost certainly heard of names such as Barolo and Barbaresco, Italy's most famous wine styles. When it comes to soil composition and other geographical characteristics, Italy offers a lot of diversity, and this never fails to show in the wines themselves.
Type of Wine Brunello: As you indulge in some fine Brunello, and you gaze into the deep brown elixir, your tongue will almost pulsate with excitement, as rich flavors of black cherry, chocolate, black raspberry, and blackberry are woven together like a heartfelt poem. An earthy, leathery undertone provides excellent contrast next to all the fruit, rounding out the experience
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Varietal Sangiovese: When it comes to Tuscan wine, Sangiovese is king. This mighty grape variety resides not only in Tuscany, but throughout Italy. The varietal is responsible for some of the greatest wines in the country, including Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, Rosso di Montalcino, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and the infamous “Super Tuscans.” Sangiovese is extremely capable of adapting to the various climates and terroirs of Italy but is quite at home in Tuscany, where it is believed to have been birthed.

Like most ancient grape varieties, there are many speculations about Sangiovese’s true time and place of origin. Some theories claim the Sangiovese grape dates back to the Etruscan era and cultivated mostly in Tuscany. Another theory is that it was cultivated by the ancient Romans. Sangiovese is believed to have been first documented in 1590 by agronomist, Gian Vettorio Soderini who talked about ‘Sanghiogeto” in an essay. There is no definitive evidence that ‘Sanghiogeto’ is the Sangiovese grape that is beloved and famous today; however, it is still considered by many to be the first appearance of the grape in written fashion. It wouldn’t be until the 18th century that Sangiovese would become well-known and started being planted all over the region. It was mentioned in l’Oenologia Toscana, written by Cosimo Villafranchi in 1773, in which he discussed the winemaking process of Chianti and the use of Sangiovese.

Today, Sangiovese accounts for 10% of all winemaking grapes planted in Italy. This statistic may not seem significant but taken into consideration there are 350 authorized grape varieties across 20 wine regions, it is quite remarkable. Due to its versatility, Sangiovese is one of the most diverse grape varieties used in winemaking. However, the grape can be temperamental and sensitive to the environment in which it is planted. It is very much similar to the Pinot Noir in this fashion. Wines made with Sangiovese grapes can turn out tasting extremely different, based on climate, terroir and process. While the varietal can successfully grow most places, it tends to grow best in hot, dry climates with terroir composed mostly of shallow, limestone soils. Famously native to Tuscany but Sangiovese also grows in many other winemaking locations in Italy, such as Umbria in Central Italy, Campania in the South and Romagna where the grape is known as Sangiovese di Romagna.

There are approximately 71,000 hectares of Sangiovese covering the earth’s surface, 62,725 of which reside in Italy (mostly Tuscany). Outside Italy, Sangiovese has grown quite popular in many winegrowing regions around the world, including the French Island of Corsica, where it ranks 2nd among all Sangiovese growing localities. It was introduced to Argentina in the late 19th century by Italian immigrants and remains successful in the region of Mendoza. Although Sangiovese was brought to America in the 1880’s, it was unpopular until the 1980’s when “Super Tuscans” caused a re-emergence of the grape in Napa Valley and Sonoma Coast. Sangiovese has also gained popularity in Barossa Valley in Southern Australia.

The thin skinned, medium sized, blue-black berries of Sangiovese produce medium to full bodied, dry and highly acidic wines with fruity and savory flavors of plum, cherry, licorice, leather, tobacco and dust. Sangiovese may be synonymous with Brunello, and vice-versa, but the world of Sangiovese is far more intricate than a single wine, a single village, hillside town or designated area of control. It is the exclusive varietal and shining star in Brunello di Montalcino and provides the backbone for Chianti and many of the great Italian wines, and has gained an outstanding reputation as one of the world’s great grape varietals.

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