2016 Guado Al Tasso Bolgheri Cont' Ugo

93
VM
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Product ID
2016-guado-al-tasso-bolgheri-cont-ugo

Wine Critic Reviews for 2016 Guado Al Tasso Bolgheri Cont' Ugo

The 2016 Cont'Ugo offers a super-appealing mix of rich, dark fruit and bright acids with notes of black cherry, graphite, plum, chocolate, savory herbs and leather. Another year in bottle has done wonders for the 2016, which is showing very well today. Drink it over the next decade or so.

Vinous Media | 93 VM
A soft and delicious merlot with berry, meat and walnut aromas. Hints of chocolate. Medium body, fine tannins and a delicious, juicy finish. Drink now.

James Suckling | 92 JS
A pure expression of Merlot, the 2016 Bolgheri Rosso Cont'Ugo is a ripe and loosely knit red wine that would wash down nicely with easy pasta dishes. The wine shows the rich softness of the grape with black cherry, tilled earth and Mediterranean herb. The wine is immediately open and accessible. Some 60,000 bottles were produced, and this vintage is a step ahead of the previous editions. You can't go wrong with this informal and generous Tuscan red.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 92 RP
This rich, vibrant red is packed with plum, black cherry and wild thyme flavors, with well-integrated tannins. Flashes of earth, leather and iron segue into the long, fruit-filled aftertaste. Best from 2020 through 2030. 500 cases imported.

Wine Spectator | 92 WS
Cont’Ugo is the most recent label from Guado al Tasso, made with 100% Merlot. Garnet in colour, it has a toasty nose with straw and plum aromas. It's creamy on the palate with a chocolatey aftertaste, and it well represents both grape and terroir. Still youthful and almost estery, this full-bodied wine will evolve for a while, developing complexity as it goes. Drinking Window 2019 - 2024.

Decanter | 90 DEC

Wine Details on 2016 Guado Al Tasso Bolgheri Cont' Ugo

More Information
Producer Tenuta Guado Al Tasso
Region Tuscany: Italian culture worships the concept of a shared meal, and their wines scream for a chance to be uncorked with your friends and family. The region's Mediterranean climate and hilly landscape combine to create a beautiful viticultural environment, where every chosen grape is brought to its full potential and transmuted into drinks worthy of gods. The vineyards are planted along the higher reaches of the hill slopes, creating a gorgeous view of the Italian landscape.

Once your lips kiss the wine, you're sent spiraling down a veritable whirlpool of pure flavor, touching upon notes of sensuous cherry, nuts, floral hints and undertones of honey and minerals. The wines can be as sweet as a fresh summer romance, and carry an air of dignity and elegance about them that can stimulate your intellect for months as you contemplate the seemingly infinite intricacies and details in the texture. Tuscany is an important part of Italian viticulture, and sampling their wines is the closest you can get to visiting this heavenly region and experiencing the culture.
Country Italy: What are the first things that come to mind when thinking about Italy and Italian culture? There's one thing that nearly everyone tends to mention, it's the food - and where there's fine food, there is almost always fine wine. Italy is the most prolific wine region in the world, outclassing even France in terms of production quantity. Even if you're a complete wine novice, you have almost certainly heard of names such as Barolo and Barbaresco, Italy's most famous wine styles. When it comes to soil composition and other geographical characteristics, Italy offers a lot of diversity, and this never fails to show in the wines themselves.
Type of Wine Super Tuscan/IGT: Many grape varietals are planted all over the world so they're not typical for one single country anymore. For instance, Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc form part of many blends coming from different countries. Super Tuscan wines are produced in this Italian region, but grape varietals used in the making are not indigenous - those are mostly Syrah, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon.
Varietal Merlot: With 266,000 hectares (657,300 acres) of vines spanning the planet, Merlot lands in 2nd place among all grape varietals planted in the world. Despite its inability to crack the top spot for most popular grape, it has remained under the radar performing as silent majority in the hallowed soils of its own origin, Bordeaux. Merlot is the most widely cultivated grape varietal in France, dominating the southwest regions, most notably, the Right bank. It is the body, mind and soul of some of the most collectable, influential and revered wines in the world.

Merlot has never had its time in the spotlight; nevertheless, has been quietly supplying the backbone for some of the most prominent wines in the Right Back since the 18th century. Merlot first appeared in French literature in 1784 when a French official claimed the wines produced from ‘Merlau’ (local French Dialect for Merlot) were the finest of its time. It is speculated that the name Merlot is derived from the French word, ‘Merle,’ meaning black bird. Whether the namesake is due to its small, deep black colored berries or the little black birds which had an affinity for the early ripening berries is still unknown. French researchers, using complex DNA fingerprinting technology (first developed by UC Davis) have concluded that Merlot is the offspring of French varietals, Cabernet Franc and Magdeleine Noire.

The Noble Bordeaux Varietal of Merlot thrives in its natural host on the Right Bank of the Gironde estuary, where the terroir is composed of rich clay, sand, limestone and iron deposits; and excels in temperate, Mediterranean, maritime climates. It dominates the vineyards of Pomerol and Saint Emilion, which have bred wines of unrivaled quality such as Chateau Petrus and Le Pin (both 100% Merlot). Merlot eventually infiltrated the Medoc (Left Bank) where it found similar and hospitable soils; ultimately influencing the wines produced there by helping to “soften” the varietals of Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc. Its first appearance in America was documented in 1850 when French nurseryman, Antoine Delmas, brought French vines to the Santa Clara Valley.

Its inhabitance would inevitably spread to terroir hotspots around the world, such as Italy, Spain, Argentina, South Africa and nearly every wine-producing country in the world. The great and world-renowned Christian Mouiex inclined to state that “when the Merlot grape is planted on the proper terroir and harvested at its peak it produces a wine that is characterized as voluptuous, generous and distinctive.”

Merlot may not dwell in the spotlight, nor possess savvy titles like its relative, Cabernet Sauvignon but rather, is the blue-collar of grape varieties, laboring to produce some of the greatest wines in the world. Though Merlot was traditionally considered a secondary and blending varietal (which it is quite successful at) conversely, is quite sustainable and capable on its own. From the illustrious Chateau Petrus in Pomerol, to Pahlmeyer in the famed Napa Valley and on to the Tuscan Legend, Masseto, all of which are composed of 100% Merlot, prove the importance and resilience of the Merlot grape varietal. The magic of Merlot has entranced the world with its subtle, soft, sensuous texture and adaptability as well also its aptitude for producing wines that can age effortlessly for decades.

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