1967 d'Yquem

100
WS
As low as $1,800.00
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Product ID
1967-dyquem

Wine Critic Reviews for 1967 d'Yquem

From one of the 20th century's celebrated vintages for Yquem, this bottle stands up to all the hype--unforgettable for its purity, elegance, harmony, its 'total' everything. Powerful, yet it seems weightless on the palate, almost defying gravity as it tangos around with its vanilla, peach and apricot flavors. Seamless, nearly endless finish. Easy to understand its reputation as the greatest Yquem of the last 35 years.

Wine Spectator | 100 WS
Generally speaking, 1967 was not a great vintage for the dry reds of Bordeaux. After a "meh" start to the Yquem harvest in early October, a spell of rain ensued, followed by warm dry temperatures in mid-October that ignited an explosion of botrytis. The rest is history: 1967 was a legendary year for Yquem. And this was indeed a very good bottle, tasted at the Chateau in spring 2019.

Displaying a gorgeous deep amber-gold color, the 1967 d'Yquem slips sensuously out of the glass with a profound perfume of dried mandarin peel, allspice, praline, cinnamon toast and orange blossoms plus hints of gingerbread and accents of lemon butter. The palate is simply electric with citrus and spice-sparked energy, delivering youthfully vibrant notes with a tantalizing floral undercurrent. Superb freshness knit inseparably with the complex sweetness makes this seem like a deceptively delicate, lithe, medium-dry style, even if the truth is far richer yet with edifying persistence. For Sauternes lovers, a perfectly preserved bottle of this wine is undoubtedly the Holy Grail.

Robert Parker Wine Advocate | 99 RP
With the possible exception of the 1945 and 1928 Yquem, the 1967 is, by most people's reckoning, the benchmark Sauternes of the 20th century. This bottle more than lived up to that reputation. Deep gold in color, it offers up a dizzying array of scents ranging from singed orange peel, caramelized pear, apricot nectar, fig cake, honey, toffee and turbinado sugar, with flavors to follow. Its viscous texture completely envelops the palate and the finish, if one can reasonably even call it a “finish”, as the wine seems to go on forever. This hauntingly complex, powerful yet shockingly lively Sauternes could be served with all sorts of decadent desserts, but it really deserves to be appreciated by itself, especially since one never knows when another chance to experience it might come around again.

Such is the fame of this wine that it has single-handedly given the 1967 vintage in Sauternes and Barsac a huge reputation when, in fact, it was actually a pretty average year for the wines, overall. On top of that, almost all of the sweet wines from 1967 are past and even well past their prime at this stage. That’s emphatically not the case with this Yquem, which is one of the most spell-binding wines that I have had the chance to drink in years, even decades. There’s no question that, at 53 years of age, the 1967 is at or near peak, but well-stored bottles should easily be breathtaking for at least another two decades, perhaps longer.

Vinous Media | 99 VM
(Château d’Yquem) Prior to this bottle of the ’67 Yquem, I had not crossed paths with this wine since my sommelier days at Gotham Bar and Grill, which was putting it back a ways. The wine has always been one of the more opulent top vintages of Yquem, and it continues to drink very well in that slightly larger than life style. The bouquet is deep, pure and sumptuous, as it wafts from the glass in a blend of crème brulée, oranges, ginger honey, clover, white cherries, barley sugar and an impressive base of minerally soil. On the palate the wine is full-bodied, deep and very powerfully built (even in the context of Yquem’s customary intensity), with a rock solid core of fruit, impeccable focus and a nearly endless finish. The wine is just a touch bitter on the backend today, which makes me wonder if it is beginning to near the far side of its absolute apogee, and may soon begin a very slow and gentle decline. Though of course this characteristic could just be unique to this particular bottle. This is a very impressive vintage of Yquem, but in terms of depth, complexity and length, there are even better ones out there. (Drink between 2007-2030)

John Giilman | 94 JG

Wine Details on 1967 d'Yquem

More Information
Producer Chateau d'Yquem: Often referred to as “Liquid Gold,” Chateau d’Yquem has become synonymous with excellence, perfection, and prestige. The Chateau has endured a long history of complexity and conflict. Its origins date back to the middle ages when it belonged to the King of England. Many events took place that are both complex and feudal; however, in 1593 the French Crown under Charles VII granted Jacques Sauvage, the descendent of a local noble family, tenure over Yquem. In 1711 the family finally enjoyed sole ownership, building the Chateau that is revered and respected today.

This epic saga has many contributing factors that aided in the shaping of this infamous Chateau through family tragedy, world wars and unfortunate legal battles. In 1785 Francoise Josephine de Sauvage became a widow after her newly wed husband died in a horse-riding accident, thrusting her to the head of the family and of the Chateau. The task was met with extraordinary acumen. The success of its bottlings had already gained recognition by many connoisseurs such as Thomas Jefferson, serving as a bright spot in its ill-fated past.

Yquem would face many more challenges throughout its history; enduring two World Wars, in which it served as a military hospital. Family disputes led to the sale of the Estate to LVMH. Multiple legal battles developed into a tempestuous relationship between the family and its buying partner. After two years of court battles, the court arranged for LVMH to purchase the remaining shares of the property.

Today, Yquem continues its legacy as perhaps the greatest wine residing in Sauternes. Great wines are not born just anywhere, by accident. A unique set of climatic and geological conditions combine to form a rare equilibrium. The soil in Yquem’s vineyard is warm and dry, accumulating heat due to the smooth flat pebbles and course gravel which collect the suns warmth. There is a good water reserve in the subsoil, thanks to the numerous springs that dwell on the Estate. The terroir is at the highest elevation in Sauternes awarding the vineyard with a unique micro-climate and allowing winds from the east to move through the vineyard helping to remove unwanted moisture. This is especially crucial later in the growing season, as the noble rot sets in.

Noble rot, otherwise known as Botrytis Cinerea, is a fungus that attacks the grapes. The very unique and specific climate of this region allows for this magical process to occur. The grapes become shriveled, dehydrated and concentrated with extraordinary characteristics. The byproduct is a honey filled, tropical, roasted nut and exotic elixir that is otherworldly. Pineapple, peaches, flowers, orange, vanilla, butterscotch, coconut and honey infiltrate the nose and palate creating an experience that is euphoric.

The vineyards are planted with 80% Semillon and 20% Sauvignon Blanc. The blend creates its flagship, Chateau d’Yquem and its second wine “Y.” The grapes are hand-picked berry by berry and due to intensive sorting practices and the process of noble rot, the yields at Yquem are extremely low. The flagship produces a mere 10,000 bottles annually.

Throughout its tumultuous history, Yquem has never failed to shine, producing wines of unrivaled quality. Yquem is the definition of perfection, perseverance, and a timeless struggle for dominance. This tremendous Chateau has risen to the “Gold” standard and sits atop the whole world of wine as one of the finest examples of winemaking at its pinnacle.
Region Sauternes: The white wines of Bordeaux are sometimes sadly looked over, as the region is primarily known for their almost absurdly powerful and delicious reds. However, if you like a refreshing, sweet treat on a late summer evening or you wish to complete your journey through Bordeaux's finest wines, you should not skip a Sauternes bottle or two. Made from a carefully balanced mixture of Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle grape varietals, this wine boasts an almost supernatural sweetness. This sugary nature can be attributed to the presence of noble rot that can cause the grapes to visually resemble raisins in a way.

We would completely understand if a single taste of fine Sauternes brought visible tears of joy to your eyes, as the flavor is just that magnificent. As you swirl the liquid gold in your mouth, an orchestral performance echoes on, with a grounding double bass of honey and the sharpness and acidity of a passionate violin solo. Notes of peach, apricot and nut punctuate the experience, sending you sky-high with inspiration and pure, emotional bliss. Let us open the door to a whole new world together.
Country France: Words fail us when trying to adequately portray France's place in the world of wine. It's downright impossible to imagine what wine would feel and taste like had it not been for France's many, many viticultural pioneers. Fine wine is the blood of France's vigorously beating heart, and it finds itself in many aspects of French culture. With a viticultural history that dates all the way back to the 6th century BC, France now enjoys its position as the most famous and reputable wine region on the planet. If you have a burning passion for masterfully crafted, mouth-watering, mind-expanding wines, then regular visits to France are probably already in your schedule, and for a good reason.
Type of Wine Dessert White: In the minds of many wine lovers, no food pairing matches the appeal of a dessert and an appropriate dessert wine. For those of us with a pronounced sweet tooth, dessert whites come in many shapes, sizes, and, most importantly, varietals. Whether you're dealing with an Austrian Pinot Blanc or a sweet German Riesling, it's hard to resist for long.
Varietal Sauternes Blend: Twenty-five miles southeast of the city of Bordeaux, in the southern end of the Graves winegrowing district, a magical event takes place – harvest season in Sauternes. Each year, beginning in September, the white grape varietals Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle become the star performers in an otherworldly transformation that takes winemaking to a completely magnificent level. Of course, this event could not take place would it not be for nature to play its part.

A unique set of climatic and geological conditions combine to form a rare equilibrium. A ghostly fog descends upon the region each morning, created by the differing water temperatures of the cool Ciron tributary as it flows into the warm Garonne River near Barsac and Preignac. The humid mornings give way to warm afternoon sun, encouraging the proliferation of Botrytis Cinerea.

Approximately 2,000 hectares of Semillon, Sauvignon Blanc and Muscadelle apron the region’s vineyards of Sauternes. Semillon is the most widely planted, with roughly 75% of the distribution in the vineyards, Sauvignon Blanc is planted to a little less than 25%, while Muscadelle inhabits the remaining hectares (Muscadelle is able to contract Botrytis Cinerea but not to the same effect, thus being used in miniscule amounts). The three allowable grapes (by AOC law) thrive in a terroir of varying degrees of chalk, limestone, sand, clay and gravel which rest over an alluvial bed. The soil in Sauternes is warm and dry, accumulating heat due to the smooth flat pebbles and course gravel which collect the suns warmth.

The Sauternes’ plateau reaches elevations of 3 to 80 meters, awarding the location with a unique set of micro-climates and allowing winds from the east to move through the vineyards helping to remove unwanted moisture. This is especially crucial later in the growing season, as the noble rot sets in.

Noble rot, otherwise known as Botrytis Cinerea, is a fungus that attacks the grapes. The very unique and specific climate of this region allows for this magical process to occur. The grapes become shriveled, dehydrated and concentrated with extraordinary characteristics. The byproduct is a honey filled, tropical, roasted nut and exotic elixir that is otherworldly. Pineapple, peaches, flowers, orange, vanilla, butterscotch, coconut and honey infiltrate the nose and palate creating an experience that is euphoric. Typical Sauterne blends are golden yellow in color and turn amber when aged.

Due to the immense risks taken during the harvesting season, where the possibility of grey rot (grapes become overly saturated with moisture) could occur or the complete absence of noble rot, they are the most expensive wines in the world to produce. This viticultural hazard combined with the “gold” quality liquid commands top-dollar prices.

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